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DW Sanders Tile & Stone Contracting President Pledges $1,000 per Month to CTEF During COVID-19 Pandemic

The Ceramic Tile Education Foundation (CTEF) gratefully acknowledges the generosity of Woody Sanders, President of D.W. Sanders Tile & Stone Contracting. Mr. Sanders has pledged to donate $1,000 per month going forward to help CTEF navigate through COVID-19.

The Ceramic Tile Education Foundation operates solely on industry sponsorship, donations, and registration fees associated with tile installation certification events for the Certified Tile Installer (CTI) and Advanced Certifications for Tile Installers (ACT) programs. Unfortunately, COVID-19 has halted all in-person certification testing activities for the foreseeable future.

The DW Sanders Tile & Stone Contracting crew.

Woody Sanders, President of D.W. Sanders Tile & Stone Contracting, headquartered in Marietta, GA, is Certified Tile Installer #1295, the Proud Employer of CTIs, and a CTI program Evaluator. Mr. Sanders is passionately committed to nurturing and educating the tile industry workforce and has said, “Had it not been for the invaluable education and certification of the CTI program, I would not be where I am today. Now it is my turn to support the CTEF.” 

CTEF can’t thank Woody enough for his generous support of the CTEF mission and the CTI program with his monthly funding commitment.  If Woody’s commitment speaks to you and you have found success in these trying times, please consider following in Woody’s footsteps on any level so that CTEF can continue to educate and certify our workforce as soon as in-person contact can be conducted safely.

To make your one-time or recurring tax-deductible donation to CTEF, please contact Cathey McAlister at 864-222-2131 or go to https://www.ceramictilefoundation.org/donate-now.

#TransformTheTrade

A new initiative to promote qualified and quality labor

The industry – and the world as we know it – has been going through some changes. But in the midst of the upheaval, some new initiatives and energy are emerging to move the industry forward in a positive way. 

Even though the Certified Tile Installer (CTI) tests have been put on hold in light of COVID-19, in the latter part of April, some discussion began percolating about crafting a message that summarized the mission of the Ceramic Tile Education Foundation (CTEF) and the broader mission of elevating the tile trade as a whole. This phrase would need to be easily and readily accessible by those on social media. 

CTEF board member Joseph Mattice, of On the Level Tile in Greenville, S.C., together with NTCA Assistant Executive Director Jim Olson, NTCA Training Director Mark Heinlein, and CTEF’s Scott Carothers and Cathey McAlister, explored several slogans and tag lines. One of the contenders was “Transform the Trade,” which originally emerged from discussions with Mattice, and other newly-named CTEF board members, Erin Albrecht of J&R Tile, San Antonio, Texas; Trask Bergerson of Bergerson Tile & Stone, Astoria, Oregon; and former CTEF Industry Liaison and Promotions Director Heidi Cronin.

Mattice brought this catch-phrase, as well as several others, to a Zoom meeting of CTIs the last weekend of April for feedback. “We polled everyone about messages – not just about the [CTI] test, but how it correlates with CTEF mission statement,” Mattice said. “Transform the Trade”
(#transformthetrade) was the overwhelming favorite of the group.

The alliterative phrase was also chosen because of the different ways it can succinctly highlight other core messages of the CTEF mission, such as:

  • Transform the Trade – Take the Test
  • Transform the Trade – Prove yourself
  • Transform the Trade – Become a CTI
  • Transform the Trade – Join CTEF

“We determined to begin using #transformthetrade as a hashtag on our posts and emails and YouTube, etc.,” Heinlein added. 

From there, Mattice connected with CTIs Jim Tsigos of Tsigos Construction, Delran, N.J., Ken Ballin of Skyro Flooring in West Creek, N.J., and Brandt Garrison of Garrison Tile & Renovation in Heyburn, Idaho, to create a Facebook group. The Facebook group is intended as both a place for CTIs to exchange information, but also where those who are interested in taking the test can come to get information from existing CTIs. Once live tests start up again, an announcement will be posted at the top of the page with locations and dates, Mattice said. Mattice also runs weekly Zoom meetings to address various aspects of the effort, such as addressing social media and programs for CTEF to support CTIs.

“Transform the trade” gives a context to discuss elevating standards and qualified labor in general: “It’s where we all want to go,” Mattice said. “It’s not just about taking the test – it’s also about getting industry partners involved. For instance, distributors have to eat a lot of terrible installs, so it benefits them to focus more on quality and qualified labor. And qualified contractors tend to buy better product, so that benefits the manufacturer. This is about the overall trade – the test is just one element of it.” 

Mattice is proud to be part of this effort. “An exciting thing is the energy the CTIs have poured into this in 1.5 weeks!” he said. “It just blew up! It’s a positive focus and a call to action. This is a step you can take that will actually transform things.”

Now when you see #transformthetrade starting to crop up on social media and industry communications, you’ll know what it all means. Check out the Facebook group to join in!

Schluter: creativity, craftsmanship, and a complete installation system lead to stunning project

This project feature reinforces our understanding of some market trends, while demonstrating unique installation methods and the timeless value of craftsmanship. It begins with an addition to an older couple’s home that includes a spacious new bathroom. The modern appointments of a tiled shower and heated floors are to be found, but there are some twists that make the project particularly interesting.

Corona installed the Schluter®-DITRA-HEAT system to provide floor warming throughout the bathroom and ensure a lasting tile application.

The builder and the tile contractor

Case Builders LLC of Lutherville, Md., specializes in design, consultation, and fine construction. They manage a multitude of projects of varying levels of complexity throughout the Mid-Atlantic and represent their clients’ construction interests throughout the United States and abroad.

NTCA member Corona Marble & Tile of Woodbine, Md., is a family-owned tile and stone contractor established in 1985, that serves the Baltimore, Annapolis, and Washington D.C. areas. Led by second generation owner/installer Mike Corona, the company takes pride in its ability to collaborate with owners, builders, designers, and architects and successfully complete intricate projects that demand the highest attention to detail. This commitment to quality and longevity is evident in Corona’s employment of Certified Tile Installers (CTIs). For more information on the CTI program, you can visit ceramictilefoundation.org.

floor warming was installed throughout, using 3-2-3 cable spacing to maximize the warmth provided by the system

Applications

Calacatta Gold stone tiles supplied by Chesapeake Tile & Marble of Owings Mills, Md., were installed throughout the 15’ x 9’ bathroom, including the
6-1/2’ x 5-1/2’ shower. This white marble with deep gray veining produced a classic look that was very much at home in the open space with large windows and abundant natural light.

Heated floors

One of the primary homeowner requirements was to ensure comfort by incorporating a floor-warming system under the tiles. The addition was built over a crawl space so the system helps to mitigate transfer of cold from the space below. 

The framed shower floor area was built 2-1/2” lower than the rest of the addition to allow the mud bed floor to be flush with the bathroom floor.

Corona installed the Schluter®-DITRA-HEAT system to provide floor warming throughout the bathroom and ensure a lasting tile application. The DITRA-HEAT-DUO uncoupling membrane features studs on the surface that secure heating cables without the use of clips or fasteners and a thermal break attached to the underside. The cables were placed wherever heat was desired and the tile was installed directly over the membrane without encapsulating the cables in a self-leveling underlayment, thereby significantly reducing installation time. The sub assembly consisted of engineered wood joists covered with a 3/4”-thick AdvanTech® subfloor, and 1/2”-thick plywood underlayment to support the stone tile installation.

Curbless shower 

The entire shower base was covered with the Schluter®-KERDI waterproofing membrane after the floor warming system was installed, per Schluter Systems instructions.

Curbless showers continue to grow in popularity for both practical and aesthetic reasons. They can make a space feel more open, and the ease of entry can help homeowners age in place if desired. Since the bathroom space was part of an addition to the house, the builder was able to plan for this from the outset. He recessed the floor joists within the shower area 2-1/2” to allow for slope to the drain without requiring extra buildup of the floor outside the shower. Corona floated a mortar bed sloped to the Schluter®-KERDI-DRAIN in the center of the shower. Since there would be no curb, it was simple to continue the DITRA-HEAT-DUO membrane and heating cables across the shower entrance and over the surface of the mortar bed. While the uncoupling membrane is itself waterproof and the heating cables are rated for wet applications, the entire shower base was covered with the Schluter®-KERDI waterproofing membrane per Schluter Systems instructions. The walls were constructed using Schluter®-KERDI-BOARD as a lightweight and easy-to-install alternative to backerboard covered with a membrane.

Floating shower bench 

The floating bench is a 76” long 3 cm-thick marble slab supported by hidden steel brackets.

Shower benches serve practical purposes in tiled showers, and the sleek appearance of a floating bench can make for an elegant design feature. The owners desired a single piece of stone spanning the full length of the 76” wall without visible supports. 

Corona met this challenge using a clever approach. An approximately 12” wide strip of foam board was removed from the length of the wall and iron L-shaped brackets, 12” long on each side, were fastened to solid blocking within the wall framing. The previously-removed board was routed using the brackets as a guide and re-installed so that it would again sit flush with the rest of the wall. Special care was taken to waterproof the area around the brackets and prevent any water infiltration into the wall cavity. A 3 cm-thick marble slab with 4” deep mitered face was installed, with the underside subsequently covered with a layer of foam board and porcelain tile. The brackets provide the necessary support and are invisible within the final application.

Supports for the slab bench were anchored to the framing and then covered with Kerdi-Board building panels that had been routed to fit flush over the brackets.

Arched entrance

Field tile was cut and aligned to fit the underside of the arch and maintain the veining for a seamless, dramatic effect.
There are knee walls on either side of the opening, with an archway above that nearly reaches the ceiling

Perhaps the most striking visual feature of the shower is the entrance itself. Corona is particularly proud of this aspect of the project and rightfully so. There are knee walls on either side of the opening, with an archway above that nearly reaches the ceiling. He painstakingly cut and aligned field tile to fit the underside of the arch and stone chair rail to form the casing. The tile was installed so that the veining in the Calacatta Gold follows the arch to dramatic effect.

Conclusion

This project is an excellent example of how homeowners, builders, and tile setters can work together to produce something really special. The clear communication of requirements by the homeowners, followed by excellent planning and execution by Case and Corona Marble & Tile was the key to success. Using a complete system per manufacturer instructions, combined with plenty of creativity and craftsmanship helps empower tile setters to produce functional, durable, and beautiful results, all within a profitable business.

Anything you can do – I can do better: tile installers poised to expand Dekton market by storm

Dekton University offers intensive training opportunities to qualified installers

It’s no news that gauged porcelain tile is going gangbusters in the tile industry. This incredibly versatile product can be used for not only walls and floors, but sinks, countertops, or any kind of cladding you can imagine.

In 2013, around the time the term “gauged porcelain” was being coined, the manufacturer of Silestone quartz surfacing launched ultra-compact surface Dekton® by Cosentino, an extremely large-format, extremely and consistently flat material that combines raw materials in a high-heat, high-compaction sintering process that makes it super strong, resistant to staining, scratching, abrasion, high heat/fire resistant, freezing and UV rays. It also is GREENGUARD certified low in chemical emissions, to benefit the environment. 

This highly-technical product originally was the purview of fabricators. But with the introduction of thinner panels – 4mm and 8 mm – Consentino is partnering with qualified labor to equip installers with the knowledge and experience to install these products with confidence and success.

Tomas Echeverria, Technical Coordinator for Cosentino, said the company is willing to invest to train installers to properly work with and install this unique product. “The company has invested a lot in manufacturing and R&D. It wouldn’t mean anything if it’s not installed properly to perform as it should,” he said. 

The benefit of this partnership was revealed at Cosentino’s national sales summit in early February in Houston. Presenters from NTCA Five-Star Contractors J&R Tile in San Antonio, Texas, and Casavant Tile in Saugerties, N.Y., provided the closing two-hour session to explain the opportunities for Cosentino to partner with qualified tile installers to expand the market for Dekton product – specifically 8mm and 4mm panels. 

Eric Tetrault of Casavant Tile (in Dekton jacket) talks with interested sales people after the presentation. 

Cosentino has partnered with NTCA Five-Star Contractors for about five years, offering preferred pricing for these top-tier installers. But the sales summit presentation pointed out the benefits of working with a much larger universe of 1,600 Certified Tile Installers (CTIs) who are dedicated to not only upholding standards in their work, but seeking the training and experience that’s needed to work bring a highly technical product like Dekton into their repertoire.

J&R Tile’s Erin Albrecht (r.) walked the attendees through the program, while J& R Tile’s Triniti Vigil (c.) and Casavant Tile’s Eric Treteault demonstrated the ease of crafting sinks and countertops with Dekton and hand tools.

J&R Tile’s Erin Albrecht walked the attendees through the program, while J& R Tile’s Triniti Vigil and Casavant Tile’s Eric Treteault demonstrated the ease of crafting sinks and countertops with Dekton and hand tools. The speed and quick turnaround of completing Dekton projects by tile installers using hand tools like grinders was eye-opening for the sales force.

Introducing Dekton University

The presentation introduced a brand new concept to the sales team: the development of Dekton University. Cosentino has committed to partnering with and supporting qualified labor locally to develop a network of highly-trained installers to install Dekton panels. Trained CTIs – many who are NTCA members – will be regional trainers in locations where Cosentino has facilities. 

Dekton University is scheduled to kick off this spring, with dates for the year in development at this writing. The plan is for each trainer, who will be funded by Cosentino, to hold two trainings regionally a month, explained Tetrault. In addition LATICRETE and Bostik have signed on to provide complete antimicrobial systems of grouts, mortars and setting materials, punching up the pro-environment qualities Dekton offers.

Dekton Madera Trilium countertop.

Training is an intense two-day, hands-on program, with resources like TCNA Handbooks, tools, equipment and resources supplied by Cosentino. Three attendees at each training will win a complete set of tools specially designed to work with Dekton, valued at between $8,000-$15,000. In addition, contractors who complete the program will have access to this tool set for 12 months on a break-even basis – if a designated amount of Dekton is sold, the contractor can keep the set for free, Tetrault explained. Equipment includes a table, cutter, and cart. They will also each take home two modules created during the trainings for marketing purposes.

That’s not all. As mentioned, NTCA Five-Star Contractors have had preferential pricing from Cosentino and will continue to do so. But pricing advantages will be tiered for CTIs, ACT-credentialed contractors and those who take the training. There will be tangible rewards, benefits and advantages for those contractors who invest in training, education and excellence. 

“Qualified labor and trade associations are at the forefront of everything: the center of the whole program,” Tetrault said “Everything revolves around that. The entire program is geared to open up a new market for Dekton, and provide unprecedented support to the installers and contractors who make the commitment to be educated and trained.” 

Trainers

Dekton University will employ a team of knowledgeable trainers to administer the program at Dekton facilities. Jamen and Chanel Carizzosa, of Icon Tile, a husband-wife installation team out of Washington, are jazzed about this program. “When Erin and Eric approached and told us about this program, we were really excited,” Jamen said. “In our area, most guys are not doing the large panels. If they get a job they try to talk the designer out of it. They are scared to touch it. Chanel and myself have wanted to push ourselves forward in getting to be better with these products.”

Zack Bonfilio, owner of San Antonio’s American Tile & Remodeling, said, “possibilities are endless” using Dekton. He said he created an integrated sink with linear drain on a foam base – including miters and cuts – in just four hours using Dekton and his grinder. There was no need for costly, time-consuming waterjet work. 

Carl “The Flash” Leonard, CTI #1393, from New Jersey asked, “Why would you trust your install to anyone who isn’t certified? Certification is key to our industry – keeping standards high.” 

These passionate and dedicated tile professionals are among those who will run the Dekton University intensives. CTIs will have first dibs on a slot in the classes, and then other promising installers will be contacted about taking the trainings.

“The big message is you don’t need a fabricator,” Albrecht said. “If you partner with skilled labor, you aren’t waiting weeks. As the song goes, ‘Anything you can do – I can do better.’ With trained tile installers, you have a one-stop shop. You can have six or less employees working with thin material, and with the right tools, set up and system, you can do a lot of square footage.” 

As much as a learning curve as it is for installers, it’s also a learning curve for Cosentino, who is open to learn what this new-to-them labor force needs to succeed, and provide strong support. 

“It took a group of tile contractors to sit down and say ‘Let’s do something about this,‘” Albrecht said. “And it took a large tile company to invest. Cosentino is a family-owned business. They care about the installers but have humility to know they are not installation experts. With Dekton University, they are looking to connect with tile contractors.

“They are listening and they care,” Albrecht added. ”They are willing to learn and become leaders – only partner with the best, on high-end installations and protect their brand. Their intentions are for everyone to support each other. They don’t want to sell to everybody. They are trying to do it right.” 

Interested in Dekton University? Contact Tomas Echeverria at (786) 527-1501 or email [email protected].

Evaluator boot camp focuses on making CTI exams more accessible

If you read our Training & Education feature by CTEF’s Scott Carothers on page 66 of our February issue, you learned about the efforts afoot by the Ceramic Tile Education Foundation (CTEF), supported by The National Tile Contractors Association (NTCA), to bring more Certified Tile Installer (CTI) exams to contractors across the country. 

Carothers explained the beginning of the program in 2008 has led to the current stable of 1,600 CTIs. CTEF has been churning out about 150 CTIs a year but there’s an outcry from the industry for more opportunities to be tested, and for more contractors to have the opportunity to become CTIs. 

In 2020, there’s a goal of reaching 2,000 CTIs by year’s end. Yet with the current number of evaluators at 11, that has been impossible. Until now.

Starting in the middle of 2019, the CTEF board approved an intense week-long training of evaluators – an Evaluator Training Boot Camp, of sorts. Four intense trainings have been held, each with 14 evaluators-in-training: a mixture of Contractor Evaluators (CEs) and evaluators who hail from manufacturer technical departments; most were once tile installers themselves (Industry Evaluators or IEs). The goal is to have 56 evaluators by spring 2020.

Existing CEs go through an update, to learn the new grading system. They had already taken the CTI exam themselves to become evaluators. But the new recruits go through a rigorous curriculum that includes taking the CTI test themselves. 

Many manufacturers are supporting this program. “CUSTOM decided to participate in this value-add program because it aligns with our commitment to industry support through quality installation by our industries,” said Will White, of Custom Building Products. David LaFleur of wedi, added, “I agreed to become an evaluator as I saw it as a great opportunity to promote qualified labor in the tile industry. I was honored when wedi chose me as their representative to this program. The trade is suffering as a whole right now due to the lack of qualified labor. The CTEF and NTCA are doing a great job at working to improve this situation, and I feel this is a great way for me to help.”

Even though many of the IEs are technical representatives, the Boot Camp was no walk in the park. Ed Cortopassi of MAPEI said he was surprised by the “intricate difficulty of the task” especially time management when taking the CTI exam. CUSTOM’s White added, “With over 240 cuts in the certification test, you better have a plan that factors in the time allotted to complete.” 

For LaFleur, “The toughest part of Boot Camp was actually taking the CTI test,” he said. “I grew a new-found respect for those who completed it and passed. It is easy to assume, given the small quantity of tile installed, that the test may not fully test someone’s abilities. I was hugely mistaken in this thought process. After being away from tile setting for about one year, it was not only difficult to finish, but certainly tested all my abilities fully. I am grateful that I was able to finish and receive a passing grade.”

LaFleur praised the enthusiasm and dedication shown by Mark Heinlein and Scott Carothers in designing and implementing the training, and for making sure IEs were well prepared to administer and evaluate the CTI exam. “I learned how important it was to be accurate and precise when evaluating a test, in order to keep the test fair to all participants,” he said. “This will keep the integrity of the test in place, helping to assure consumers can trust they are hiring someone with the skills required to complete their projects.” Similarly, Daniel Grant of Ardex Americas said he was “happy to learn that the scoring was very clear, and mostly not subjective to the evaluator’s opinion or viewpoint.”

One thing White discovered  during the training was that installation technique and ability are perishable assets. “I have not installed tile on a production scale for 20 years – this camp showed me how an everyday task is not like riding a bike – you must practice this often to remain relevant and capable,” he said.

Ardex’s Grant said that in addition to the extended days in a hot warehouse, one of the tough aspects of the test was “Having to intentionally install several aspects of the module incorrectly for the evaluators to try to catch.” 

After completing the Boot Camp and the CTI exam, IEs had some words of wisdom for those planning to take the CTI exam. 

“My piece of advice is simple,” wedi’s LaFleur said. “Do not get worked up on the task at hand. All the information you need to pass is given to you in the study material. Treat the test like any other day at work. Devise a plan as to how you will complete the test in the time given and then execute it. The world is not perfect, so do not get hung up on any one detail.”

MAPEI’s Cortopassi added, “Make sure to attend the orientation the night before and pay attention to the many little details.”

And CUSTOM’s White said, “This is a certification test for those who earn it – not a guarantee you will pass. Study, plan and learn. May the Tile Force be with you always!”

One of the highlights of the Boot Camp was the “camaraderie from some of the other attendees,” said Ardex’s Grant, an opinion echoed by White. “What a great experience to understand we are in this together and quality can be achieved,” he said.

The Certified Tile Installer Program is on the move

The Certified Tile Installer (CTI) program began in April of 2008 with just five installers at the Coverings show in Orlando, Fla. Now, 11 years later, the program has grown to over 1,600 CTIs. Not bad, but in order to meet the current consumer demand, we need more qualified labor in the field – and that is exactly what the Ceramic Tile Education Foundation (CTEF) is doing in 2020.

The vapor retarding membrane is off to a good start.

With the help of the National Tile Contractors Association (NTCA), CTEF is ramping up the CTI program in many ways. First off, Heidi Cronin was hired by CTEF as the Industry Liaison and Promotions Director. The NTCA is generously donating the skills of Assistant Executive Director Jim Olson and the expertise of Training Director Mark Heinlein to help move the CTI program to the next level.

Contract Evaluators: bringing the CTI exam to you!

The current group of CTIs who are evaluating the hands-on test were formally known as Regional Evaluators, but they are now known as Contract Evaluators. This dedicated group of evaluators, for the most part, are self-employed installers or employees of tile contracting companies that are also NTCA members. They have demonstrated that they have the passion to get the job done with high standards and integrity.

The backer board is being installed on the floor.

In order to test more installers who could potentially become CTIs, CTEF needs additional evaluators to conduct the hands-on tests. The idea of how to facilitate this increased number of evaluators came at the CTEF Board of Directors meeting at Coverings ‘19 from the suggestion made by board member Andy Acker of Schluter Systems. His idea was to use manufacturers’ technical service representatives rather than sales people to create a new category of evaluator. Program Managers Mark Heinlein and Scott Carothers developed a plan to train these new evaluators. Within three months, the plan was in place with the first class being held in July, 2019.

This stable of technical reps are being provided through the generosity of numerous tile industry manufacturers who realize the need for qualified labor to utilize their products and install tile successfully the first time. They have responded by placing key employees into this program that CTEF could not launch without their support.

Industry Evaluators: technical reps to expand opportunities for certification

The completed hands-on module is ready to be evaluated.

This new segment of test administrators is known as an Industry Evaluator (IE). The training class for the IEs, known as “CTI Boot Camp,” is an intense five-day program held at the CTEF facilities in Pendleton, SC. The curriculum of the program includes the history of the CTI, a concentrated classroom study of the TCNA Handbook and ANSI documents, how to construct, assemble, erect, and palletize the CTI test module, a thorough study of the CTI Evaluator Scoresheet and Installer Improvement Form, and actually taking the CTI hands-on test. The intensity of the first CTI Boot Camp was further strengthened in the July class where the average warehouse temperature was a sweltering 100° Fahrenheit with matching South Carolina humidity.

The next step finds the IE trainee shadowing one of the CTI Program Managers on one or more tests to score it in real-time. When their training is successfully completed, the new IE will conduct an actual test with a Program Manager monitoring. The final step is to hit the highway as an Industry Evaluator setting up tests at company facilities or distributor locations to grow the CTI ranks.

The existing Contract Evaluators also attended a similar training Boot Camp at CTEF in January, 2020 to ensure that all of the new program enhancements are understood and incorporated into the hands-on testing. An additional Boot Camp is in the planning stages for current CTIs who desire to become a Contract Evaluator.

At the end of the day, it all comes down.

The initial goal of the new CTI Evaluator program was to have 40 Evaluators working within the training process by the end of 2019. This goal has been met and will begin to show significant results in 2020. 

Catch the enthusiasm and help push the CTI wagon up to the top of the hill.

Use your time wisely

Most of us would agree that there is just not enough time in the day to get everything done. There is always some sort of fire to extinguish, the unexpected phone call that takes longer than planned, or pleasing your customer who wants to add more work to the project just when you were planning to call it complete.

The work is on the schedule and needs to be completed as planned and promised. But how do you squeeze more time out of the clock or jam more stuff into the available time? The answer is time management.  

Wikipedia defines time management as: “The process of planning and exercising conscious control of time spent on specific activities, especially to increase effectiveness, efficiency, and productivity.” Further, planning or forethought is the process of thinking about and organizing the activities required to achieve a desired goal.

In order to apply these principles in the tile trades, an installer must develop a plan of action by either building the project in his or her head prior to beginning the work, or by sketching it out on a piece of paper. Having a plan in place is the roadmap to a successful project completion. 

Plan ahead with a grid pattern for layout

Waiting in line at the wet saw to make two cuts is a huge waste of time. 

The use of a grid pattern for floor tile layout is a good example. It may take a little more time to mark the layout on the substrate, pop key lines, and grid it out, but once in place, all the perimeter cuts can be made. Making these cuts on a snap cutter saves more time. In this case, almost all of the cuts, with the exception of “L” cuts, can be made right where they will be installed. No need to walk to the wet saw, make the cut(s), dry the back of the tile, and walk back to the install point. Additionally, once the mortar is properly mixed, the grid pattern allows multiple installers to work in the same area, which really increases productivity.

When cuts need to be made on a wet saw and the installer is working alone, mark as many pieces that can be safely carried to the saw and make all of them at one time. Making multiple trips to the saw with only one or two cuts can devour a huge amount of time. 

Better-grade materials can save time

Using a better grade of setting materials that have thixotropic (becoming flowable when moved in a back and forth motion) characteristics will yield better mortar coverage and transfer to the back of the tile. Many times, these products will eliminate the need to back-trowel (formerly known as back-buttering) the tile with additional mortar.

Keeping focused

Evaluators of the Certified Tile Installer (CTI) program routinely stress this phrase to the installers preparing to take the hands-on test: “Use your time wisely!”

Something that wasn’t even a factor ten years ago is now a significant drain on the productivity of a tile installation. Not surprisingly, a smartphone and Facebook bring new challenges to the workplace. Everyone needs to be connected these days, but the jobsite should be just that, with nothing to interrupt the thoughts that went into the plan. When focus is lost, so is the valuable time that is needed to get back on track and keep moving. 

One more thought; show up to the job early each day well rested and ready to go. Establish your plan and stick to it.

And finally, the Evaluators of the Certified Tile Installer (CTI) program routinely stress this phrase to the installers preparing to take the hands-on test: “Use your time wisely!” 

CTEF Focuses on CTI Evaluator Training and Finished Tile Work Education Sessions During TISE 2020

Pendleton, SC – During the International Surfaces Event (TISE) 2020 in Las Vegas, NV, the Ceramic Tile Education Foundation (CTEF) which provides education and installer certification for professionals working in the ceramic tile and stone industry will focus on Finished Tile Work education sessions and Certified Tile Installer (CTI) Evaluator Training. CTEF will be sharing booth #4727 with the National Tile Contractors Association (NTCA).

On Wednesday, January 29, Scott Carothers, Director of Certification and Training at CTEF will conduct a seminar entitled “Finished Tile Work – Do It Wrong or Do It Right: Lippage, Grout Joints, and Patterns”.  That afternoon, he will have a hands-on demonstration on the show floor to reinforce the same topic.

In its booth space, CTEF will construct three Certified Tile Installer (CTI) hands-on testing modules in progressive stages of completion for display. The CTEF Certified Tile Installer (CTI) program is the only third-party assessment of installer skill and knowledge which is recognized by the tile industry.

More importantly, the organization will offer shadowing opportunities to new CTI Industry Evaluators in order to move them to the next level of expertise of test set-up, the evaluation process and scoring. Industry Evaluators offer CTEF the means to expand the CTI program to more locations around the country in response to more tile installation contractors wanting to become CTIs.

The CTI designation identifies the professional installer who has reached a level of proficiency to independently and consistently produce a sound tile installation that displays good workmanship. Certification is the validation of the skills and knowledge of the men and women who presently are installing tile successfully in the United States. It offers property owners, both residential and commercial, peace-of-mind that their tile installer has the right skills and knowledge to complete a successful tile installation.

The CTI program includes two separate tests.

  • An online open-book exam taken at home or the office as the installer’s schedule allows.
  • A hands-on evaluation conducted at regional locations across the United States.

To qualify for the CTI Program, installers must have at least two years of experience as the lead installer setting ceramic tile on a full-time basis. This means having full responsibility for substrate prep, layout, coordinating with other trades along with properly installing underlayment, tile, grout and sealant materials.

The Ceramic Tile Education Foundation (CTEF) which sponsors the CTI program is supported by all segments of the ceramic tile industry. CTEF is headquartered in Pendleton, South Carolina, near Clemson University and the offices of the Tile Council of North America (TCNA).

To learn more, visit CTEF at Booth #4727 during TISE 2020 or visit https://www.intlsurfaceevent.com/en/home.html.

Let’s do this! #BecomeaCTI

There has been a lot of buzz lately surrounding the Ceramic Tile Education Foundation’s (CTEF) Certified Tile Installer (CTI) testing program. As a newcomer into the organization, I see room for the program to grow, and its potential to change the industry. 

The foundation of the program has been established: the CTEF developed a test that incorporates industry standards and challenges. It stretches the common beliefs of an installer, and requires a great deal of time management. Those who are passionate, yearn for education, and like a good challenge are showing interest, and are registering to become a Certified Tile Installer. 

Those who have taken the test know its demands and challenges. What becoming a CTI does is show the consumer/customer you follow industry standards, take pride in staying educated, and strive to do things correctly. Whether you are residential or commercial, becoming a CTI can make a huge difference in the fight for qualified labor. 

It is time for the trade to change the consumer mindset on labor. Budgets on projects should include allowances for quality installation, and not be about the lowest bid. Becoming a CTI increases the leverage needed to engage change. With that leverage, we will be able to build upon the progress that the NTCA Five-Star Contractor program has accomplished in getting qualified labor specified. Getting the architectural, design, builder, and retail community to specify and require CTIs creates a channel for the installer to make the compensation that is deserved.

Joining NTCA is a conduit to becoming a CTI. The CTEF and NTCA are working closely together to educate the industry on tile industry standards, methods, and best practices found in ANSI A108/A118, the TCNA Handbook for Ceramic, Glass and Stone Tile Installation, and manufacturer instructions, giving them the tools needed to become a certified installer. We are in the process of increasing CTI testing opportunities across the country, paying attention to the demographic areas where qualified labor is lacking. In 2020 we will be increasing efforts to secure sites for CTI testing and NTCA Workshops with our industry partners. 

Social media has played a huge role in CTEF’s recruitment of future CTIs, mainly from current CTIs mentoring, encouraging, and sponsoring future CTIs. This outpouring of support is how change gets initiated. The CTEF is grateful for our CTI graduates, and their participation in making the program a success. We are dedicated in 2020 to secure regional locations to expand the Advanced Certification (ACT) program, and have regular
scheduled opportunities available as well. 

I am excited to see what the future brings. 2020 will be a busy year. The opportunity to make a difference is at the industry’s fingertips. The CTEF and NTCA are dedicated to assuring qualified labor is required on jobsites. Become a CTI today. Please visit www.ceramictileeducationfoundation.org for more information. 

CTI testing stretches the common beliefs of an installer, and requires a great deal of time management. It shows your clients that you follow industry standards, take pride in staying educated, and strive to do things correctly.

JSG’s Stephen Belyea made the leap from chef to tile contractor

What do Legal Sea Foods of Boston and tile contracting have in common? Stephen Belyea, owner of JSG Tile and Stone LLC in Weymouth, Mass. (jsgtileandstone.com) is the common thread in both scenarios. Belyea gave up his career as head chef at Legal Sea Foods and pursued commercial flooring work with a small company while he was contemplating his next move in the restaurant business.

“When I realized how much better life could be not working 12-15 hours a day, I stuck to learning as much as I could about flooring,” Belyea said. “I worked my way up to a lead installer and enjoyed the work I was doing” – work that included installing carpet, wood, vinyl, rubber and turf in the gyms at Gillette Stadium and Fenway Park.

Belyea gravitated towards tile, captivated by the rewarding technical aspects of the installations, and eventually focused solely on tile. Pursuing his passion for tile the same way he pursued his passion for food, he made excellence his goal. “I wanted to be as good as I could be,” he said. “I attended any and all events I could to network, meet people and learn as much as I could.”

The Tile Geeks Madison Fields Project in 2017 was one of the most rewarding personal and professional projects in which Belyea ever participated.

In 2014, he discovered Tile Geeks on Facebook – only 500 strong at that time. “I realized from that page that there was a hell of a lot of knowledge about tile I did not have.” Belyea said. “So I made a point to learn about all the new/different techniques and tools there were. I have attended Coverings in Las Vegas, Chicago, Orlando, and Atlanta.” Belyea met Salvatore DiBlasi through Tile Geeks and in person at the Journal of Light Construction show in 2015 and the two have been great friends since.

In Chicago 2016, Belyea met NTCA member Bradford Denny, who signed him up as a NTCA member. “Joining the NTCA has been a great choice for me,” Belyea explained. “It has given me access to some of

Brad Denny (L) signed Stephen Belyea to NTCA membership in Coverings 16 in Chicago.

the best and brightest in the business. I know that I have access to people like Mark Heinlein – who is a great friend and resource – to turn to when I have questions about an installation method I might not be well versed in. A year after joining, I became a State Ambassador for the NTCA. I attend workshops all over New England giving support to the NTCA at their events.”

In December 2016, Belyea and DiBlasi took a road trip to the CTEF in South Carolina to attend a Tile Love/Schluter/CTI event. Belyea also took the Certified Tile Installer (CTI) test and passed as CTI #1274.

“I have the pleasure of seeing my test in Sal’s video, which is also used by the CTEF in a video to promote qualified labor,” Belyea said. “I am currently a Regional Evaluator for the CTEF and look forward to certifying more installers in my area. Being a CTI has helped me in my business because it shows my customers that I have a vested interest in the industry. Educated consumers realize that they are better off having their project done right by a professional the first time, rather than a costly failed project being done for a second time.”

CTEF’s Scott Carothers evaluates Belyea’s CTI hands-on test.

Today Belyea is cooking with gas, bringing artistry and excellence to high-end residential custom tile projects, from new construction on summer houses in Cape Cod to renovations on multi-million dollar residences in downtown Boston.

“I take great joy and pride in what I do,” he said. “I compare the finished tile project to a prepared meal. The customer’s approval of the finished project is very rewarding to me.”

Another rewarding experience – one of the highlights of both his life and his career – was to be part of the Tile Geeks Project last year in Dickerson, Md., for the Madison Fields Autism Foundation (see TileLetter, January 2018 issue). “It was nine grueling days of work,” he said. “But I am so glad I did it. I got to meet and work with great people, installers and now friends.”

JSG Tile and Stone LLC project work

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