Natural Stone Institute Announces Call for Entries for 2018 Industry Recognition Awards and Pinnacle Awards

Oberlin, OH, May 16, 2018— The Natural Stone Institute is pleased to announce that the call for entries for the 2018 Industry Recognition Awards is now open. Submissions for all awards are due Friday, July 20.

Natural Stone Institute members are invited to nominate colleagues for the following awards:

Migliore Award for Lifetime Achievement. This award pays tribute to an individual who has made extraordinary contributions to the natural stone industry.

Women in Stone Pioneer Award. Sponsored by TexaStone Quarries, this award recognizes a trailblazer within the stone industry for their role in recruiting, retaining, and advancing women. The recipient’s performance in promoting women should be exemplary, honorable, and inspirational.

Natural Stone Craftsman of the Year Award. Sponsored by Polycor and Custom Building Products, this award was established to honor an individual whose craftsmanship in the natural stone industry stands out above all else.

Natural Stone Scholarship. Sponsored by Coldspring, Delaware Quarries, and the Natural Stone Foundation, this scholarship provides educational opportunities for aspiring stone professionals interested in furthering their careers within the natural stone industry.

Women in Stone Empowerment Scholarship. Sponsored by the Natural Stone Foundation, this scholarship provides a guided educational experience to one of three industry events to a woman showing a strong passion to grow their career within the stone industry.

For more information about these awards, including nomination forms and submission requirements, please visit www.naturalstoneinstitute.org/awards.

In addition, the call for entries for the 2018 Pinnacle Awards is now open. Submissions are due by Friday, July 20.

The Pinnacle Awards honor projects where beauty, creativity, ingenuity, and craftsmanship exemplify professional mastery in the use of natural stone for commercial and residential applications.

Four new categories have been introduced this year, allowing for a broader range of natural stone craftsmanship to be showcased and honored. Pinnacle Awards will be given in the following seven categories:

  • Commercial Interior
  • Commercial Exterior
  • Renovation/Restoration
  • Residential Interior/Exterior—Single Family (New category)
  • Residential Interior/Exterior—Multi-Family (New category)
  • Architectural Carving/Lettering/Sculpture (New category)
  • Public Landscapes/Parks/Memorials (New category)

A Grande Pinnacle Award (sponsored by Marmomac) will be presented to the best overall project. An award for the best use of Brazilian stone (sponsored by Vitoria Stone Fair) will also be available within each category. The Natural Stone Institute would like to thank the following companies for sponsoring the Pinnacle Awards: MAPEI (Commercial Awards), GranQuartz (Residential Awards), and Coldspring (Renovation/Restoration Awards).

David Castellucci, Pinnacle Jury Committee Chair, commented: “I am pleased to announce the changes to the Pinnacle Award categories for 2018. Separating the residential awards into ‘single family’ and ‘multi-family’ extends the opportunity to participate both to small and medium sized shops and those who cater to larger volume clients. The new Public Landscapes an Architectural Carving categories open up the awards program to members who have not previously participated.”

The Pinnacle Awards are open to all Natural Stone Institute member companies, and will be recognized during the Natural Stone Institute Awards Celebration at TISE 2019. The winning projects will be displayed at TISE 2019 and promoted at other trade shows and in industry publications throughout the year.

For more information, including submission forms and a list of requirements, please visit www.naturalstoneinstitute.org/pinnacleawards.

 

Stone – May 2018 – Installation – General Information

Installation-General Information:

an excerpt from the Dimension Stone Design Manual

The Natural Stone Institute maintains a Natural Stone Resource library for Architects, Designers and Contractors at this site:  https://bit.ly/2Fxo4mB. There are 274 documents that represent a wealth of information and wisdom to those who work with stone – 101 documents alone that deal with some aspect of stone installation. 

This document, Installation-General Information, is derived from an excerpt from the Dimension Stone Design Manual, Version VIII (May 2016). The included section below references materials and methods for setting a range of natural stone. 


3.0 RELATED MATERIALS

3.1 Setting Bed Mortars

3.1.1 Portland Cement Mortar (Thick Bed)

3.1.1.1 Portland cement mortar is a mixture of portland cement and sand, roughly in proportions of 1:3 for floors, and of portland cement, sand, and lime in proportions of 1:5:½ to 1:7:1 for walls.

3.1.1.2 Installation Methods. Portland cement mortar is suitable for most surfaces and ordinary types of installation. The thick bed, 3/8” to 1-1/2” on walls and nominally 1-1/4” on floors, facilitates accurate slopes or planes in the finished work. There are two equivalent methods recognized for installing stone tile with a portland cement mortar bed on walls, ceilings, and floors:

3.1.1.2.1 The method (ANSI A108.1A) that requires that the stone be set on a mortar bed that is still plastic.

3.1.1.2.2 The method (ANSI A108.1B) that requires the stone to be thin set on a cured mortar bed with dry set or latex portland cement mortar or a two-part, 100% solids epoxy.

3.1.1.3 Suitable Backings Portland cement mortars can be reinforced with metal lath or mesh, backed with membranes, and applied on metal lath over open studding on walls or on rough floors. They are structurally strong, not affected by prolonged contact with water, and can be used to plumb and square surfaces installed by others. Suitable backings, when properly prepared, are brick or concrete masonry unit, concrete, wood or steel stud frame, rough wood floors, plywood floors, foam insulation board, gypsum board, and gypsum plaster. The one coat method may be used over masonry, plaster, or other solid backing that provides firm anchorage for metal lath.

3.1.1.4 Installation and Material Specifications. Complete installation and material specifications are contained in ANSI A108.1 for installation when bed is still plastic, and for cured float bed and thin set applications.

3.1.2 Thin-Set Mortar [Thin Bed (ANSI A118.1)]

3.1.2.1 Thin-set mortar is a mixture of portland cement with sand and additives providing water retention, and is used as a bond coat for setting stone.

3.1.2.2 Installation Methods. Thin-set mortar is suitable for use over a variety of surfaces. The stone should be properly tamped in place into the mortar, which will be one layer as thin as 3/32” after tamping. Thin set mortar has excellent water and impact resistance, can be cleaned with water, is nonflammable and good for exterior work.

3.1.2.3 Thin-set mortar is available as a factory-sanded mortar to which only water need be added. Cured thin set mortar is not affected by prolonged contact with water, but does not form a water barrier. It is not intended to be used in trueing or leveling the substrate surfaces as tile is being installed.

3.1.2.4 Suitable backings. When properly prepared and in sound structural condition, suitable backings include plumb and true masonry, concrete, gypsum board, cementitious backer units, terrazzo, cured portland cement mortar beds, brick, ceramic tile, and dimension stone. Existing control joints including divider strips shall be maintained. Polished, glossy, honed, or smooth backup surfaces shall be roughened by sanding or scarifying. See ANSI A108.01 General Requirements: Subsurfaces and Preparations by Other Trades. 

3.1.2.5 Installation and Material Specifications. Complete installation and material specifications are contained in ANSI A108.5 and A118.1.

3.1.3 Latex-Portland Cement Mortar [Thin Bed(ANSI A118.4)]

3.1.3.1 Latex-Portland cement mortar is a mixture of portland cement, sand, and special latex additives which is used as a bond coat for setting stone tile.

3.1.3.2 Installation Methods. The uses of latex-portland cement mortar are similar to those of thin-set mortar. It is less rigid than portland cement mortar.

3.1.3.3 When latex-portland cement mortar is used to install stone in a wet area that may not thoroughly dry out in use (e.g., swimming pools and gang showers, etc.), it is recommended that the complete installation be allowed to dry out thoroughly (cure) before exposure to water. Consult the thin-set manufacturer for curing instructions. Latexes vary considerably, and the directions of the latex Manufacturer must be followed explicitly.

3.1.3.4 Suitable backings (See 3.1.2.4 above). 

3.1.3.5 Installation and Material Specifications. Complete installation specifications and material specifications are contained in ANSI A108.5 and ANSI A118.4.

3.1.4 Epoxy Mortar (ANSI A118.3)

3.1.4.1 This is a thin bed mortar system employing epoxy resin and epoxy hardener portions. A two-part, 100% solid epoxy is to be used as the setting bed for green colored marbles, serpentine stones susceptible to warping and for any fiberglass mesh-backed tiles.

3.1.4.2 Suitable Backings . Acceptable substrates, when properly prepared and structurally sound, include concrete, APA rated Exposure 1 underlayment grade plywood* , steel plate, and ceramic tile. 

Application is made in one thin layer. Pot life, adhesion, water cleanability before cure, and chemical resistance vary with manufacturer. 

3.1.4.3 Installation and Material Specifications. Complete installation and material specifications are contained in ANSI A108.6 and ANSI A118.3.

3.1.5 Limestone Setting Mortar. Cement used with limestone shall be white portland cement, ASTM C150, or white masonry cement, ASTM C91. Nonstaining cement shall contain not more than 0.03% of water-soluble alkali when determined in accordance with procedure 15, calculation 16 of ASTM C91 or Federal Specification SS-C181C. However, if a large amount of normal cement has been used in the backup material, and if an effective water barrier has not been provided between the stone and the backup, the use of nonstaining cement may not prevent all discoloration. 

Discoloration will disappear as the stone dries. The Indiana Limestone Institute recommends a 1:1:6 (portland:lime:sand) or Type N mortar be used with Indiana Limestone. At the present time, there are few masonry cement mortars produced labeled “nonstaining.”

3.1.6 Setting Bed. White portland cement with low alkali content is required for all light colored stone varieties.

3.2 Grouts Between Stones

3.2.1 Commercial Portland Cement Grout (“Unsanded Grout”)

3.2.1.1 Commercial portland cement grout is a mixture of portland cement and other ingredients, producing a water-resistant, dense, uniformly colored material. There are two types: white and gray. Damp curing is advantageous for both wall and floor types.

3.2.2 Sand-Portland Cement Grout (“Sanded Grout”)

3.2.2.1 Sand-portland cement grout is an on the job mixture of one of the following proportions: one part portland cement to one part clean, fine-graded sand (ASTM C144) used for joints up to 1/8” wide; 1:2 for joints up to 1/2” wide; and 1:3 for joints over 1/2” wide. Up to 1/5 part lime may be added. Damp curing is necessary. Sand-portland cement grout should be applied with caution over softer varieties of stone with honed or polished finishes because it may scratch the stone surface.

3.2.3 Polymer Modified Portland Cement Grout (ANSI A118.7)

3.2.3.1 Polymer modified portland cement grout is a mixture of any of the preceding grouts with polymer admixtures. The common polymer types are latex and acrylic. This grout is suitable for all installations subject to ordinary use and for most commercial installations. The use of polymer additives in portland cement grout increases the flexibility of the grout and reduces the permeability. Consult the grout and polymer manufacturers for specific instructions. It is less absorptive than regular cement grout.

3.2.4 Colored Grouts

3.2.4.1 Many manufacturers offer grouting materials in colors. Architects and Designers find them pleasing for aesthetic reasons. Since some stones are more porous than others, test to determine the stability of the relationship between the colored joint filler and the stone before proceeding. Make certain pigments contained in the colored grout do not stain the stone.

3.3 Sand. Sand should comply with ASTM C144.

3.4 Water. Mixing water must be potable quality.

3.5 Stone Sealants, Backing Rods, and Caulking

3.5.1 Building sealants are normally covered as a separate section in project specifications, and in most trade areas the installation of sealants is not in the trade jurisdiction of Marble Mechanics and Stonemasons. Grouting is almost always in the stone specification.

3.5.2 Silicone Sealants. Some grades of silicone sealants are not recommended by their manufacturers for application on high calcite content materials. Consult the Sealant Manufacturer’s technical recommendation before applying a given sealant to calcite materials.

3.5.3 Severe service areas (patios, decks, traffic surfaces) should be caulked with materials having sufficient abrasion resistance. Consult Sealant Manufacturer’s technical recommendations for sealants in these areas.

3.5.4 Oil based organic sealants should not be used in conjunction with natural stone products because they may stain the stone.

3.5.5 Sealing the Face of the Stone. Nothing in this section is intended to imply that actual sealing of the faces of the stones is a recommended practice. If any sealer coating is specified for any natural stone material, advice should be sought in detail from qualified Stone Suppliers or Installers (See Ch. 3, pg. 3-5, section 5.10). 

3.5.6 Joint Filler. An important feature in the determination of the joint sealant is the selection of the joint filler. The joint filler, or backing rod, performs three functions:

3.5.6.1 Controls both the depth and shape of the sealant.

3.5.6.2 Provides support for the caulking sealant when it is being compressed during tooling.

3.5.6.3 Acts as a bond breaker for the sealant to prevent three sided adhesion. (Three-sided adhesion can result in failure of the sealant.)

3.5.7 Waterproof sealant is applied in joints that have backing rods inserted. The backing rods can be porous (open cell), or nonporous (closed cell), and are typically made of polyethylene or polystyrene rope.

3.5.8 Consult the Sealant, Waterproofing, and Restoration Institute guidelines for further information on proper joint sealant design, selection, and installation.

3.6 Expansion Joints

3.6.1 Design and Location. Expansion and/or movement joints are essential for the success of stone installations. Various methods require proper design and location of expansion joints as shown in “Method EJ171,” from the Tile Council of North America Installation Handbook. [Ed. note: TCNA Handbook for Ceramic, Glass and Stone Tile Installation] Because of the limitless conditions and structural systems in which stone can be installed, the Specifying Authority shall show locations and details of expansion joints on project drawings.

3.6.2 Final Design. It is not the intent of this manual to make control and expansion joint recommendations for a specific project. The Architect must specify control and expansion joints and show location and details on drawings.

3.6.3 Sealants. Where so specified, joints shall be pointed with the sealant(s) referred to in this section, after first installing the specified backup material and applying a primer if required, all in strict accordance with the printed instructions of the Sealant Manufacturer.

3.6.4 All sealants shall be tooled to ensure maximum adhesion to the contact surfaces.

3.6.5 Expansion joint sealants include silicone, urethane, and polysulfide. Generally, urethane sealants are recommended for horizontal stone surfaces because of their resistance to abrasion and penetration.

3.6.6 Silicone sealants may be used in expansion joints on both exterior and interior vertical stone surfaces. Some one part, mildew-resistant silicone sealants are formulated with fungicide for sealing interior joints in showers and around tubs, sinks, and plumbing fixtures.

3.6.7 Sealants should comply with ASTM C920.

3.7 Substrate Limitations

3.7.1 Moisture Penetration. The performance of a properly installed stone installation is dependent upon the durability and dimensional stability of the substrate to which it is bonded. The user is cautioned that certain substrate materials used in wet areas may be subject to deterioration from moisture penetration.

3.7.1.1 Wet Areas. “Wet areas” are stone surfaces that are either soaked, saturated, or subjected to moisture or liquids (usually water), e.g., gang showers, tub enclosures, showers, laundries, saunas, steam rooms, swimming pools, hot tubs, and exterior areas.

3.7.2 Self Leveling Underlayments. Gypsum-based and self-leveling underlayments are not recommended for use with stone paving, except in conjunction with an approved water-proofing/crack isolation membrane(See ANSI A118.10-118.12). If using this method, extreme caution in following the Manufacturer’s recommended procedure is required.

3.7.2.1 Installation of stone paving directly over gypsum based underlayment is not recommended.

3.8 Deflection of Surfaces

3.8.1 General Contractor Responsibility. It is the responsibility of the General Contractor to provide a rigid, code-compliant structure that is adequate to accommodate the stone and its anchorage including all associated loads and forces.

3.8.2 Cast-in-Place Concrete Floors. Design substrate for total load deflection not exceeding L/360, as measured between control or expansion joints.

3.8.3 Frame Construction. The subfloor areas over which stone tile is to be applied must be designed to have a deflection not exceeding L/720 of the span. In calculating load, the weight of the stone and setting bed must be considered.

3.8.3.1 Strongbacks, cross-bridging or other reinforcement shall be used to limit differential deflection between adjacent framing members.

3.8.4 Maximum variation of a concrete slab or subfloor shall not exceed 1/8” in 10’ from the required plane when thin set systems are applied.

3.8.5 Allowance should be made for live load and impact, as well as all dead load, including weight of stone and setting bed.

3.8.5.1 Mortar Bed Weight. For estimating purposes, mortar bed weight can be approximated as 0.75 lb. per square foot per each 1/16” of thickness.

3.8.5.2 Stone Weight. For estimating purposes, stone weight can be approximated as 1 lb. per square foot per each 1/16” of thickness.

4.0 SAMPLES

4.1 The Dimension Stone Contractor shall furnish samples of the various dimension stones to be used. Samples shall indicate the extremes of color, veining, and marking the stone supplied to the project will have. Samples must be approved or rejected in their entirety, without stipulation.

4.2 Pending the scope of the installation and the variability of the stone product, a full-sized mockup may be required to adequately demonstrate the range of the material’s color and character.

4.3 Inspection of supplied material to evaluate compliance with approved samples shall be done at a viewing distance of not less than 6’-0” with natural lighting.

5.0 CARVING

5.1 All carving called for shall be performed by skilled workmen in strict accordance with approved full-size details or models. Architectural drawings will show approximate depth and relief of carving. Carving shall be left as it comes from the tool, unless otherwise specified.

6.0 FIELD REPAIR 

6.1 During the progress of construction, changes are often necessary to accommodate other trade and design revisions. These changes may require job site cutting and some finishing of stone, and this can be executed satisfactorily by qualified mechanics. 

6.2 Repair or patching is sometimes necessary due to damage of material either on-site or in transit. By allowing these repairs to be made on-site, progress of the job can be maintained, thus aiding the successful completion of the work. Repairs should not detract from the desired appearance or strength of the completed installation. 

7.0 STONE TILE INSTALLATION REFERENCES. The Natural Stone Institute has participated in the Tile Council of North America’s (TCNA) development of the Handbook for Ceramic, Glass, and Stone Installation. This document is reprinted every year, although the handbook committee meets only biennially, so substantial revisions are likely to appear only biennially. This handbook includes a section dedicated to the installation of stone tile products. The details are not duplicated in the Natural Stone Institute publications. Contact the TCNA (www.tcnatile.com) or the Natural Stone Institute’s Book Store to obtain a copy of the handbook. 

This document also contains information about:

8.0 TRIPS AND TRAPS OCCURRING IN THE INSTALLATION OF NATURAL STONE, including stone tiles with fiberglass mesh backing, green colored stone, travertine voids, sealant staining, efflorescence, down washed lighting, reflection, and polishing wheel marks. To view the complete document, visit https://bit.ly/2HMniEa online. 

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Printed with permission from the Natural Stone Institute. 

*APA – The Engineered Wood Association, Voluntary Production Standard PS 1-07 Structural Plywood.

Natural Stone Institute Announces New Staff Member

Oberlin, OH, March 26, 2018— The Natural Stone Institute is pleased to announce that Dacia Woodworth has joined the staff as Architect & Design Community Liaison and Special Projects Manager. Initially she will focus on expanding industry awareness of the association’s natural stone testing lab capabilities. Her primary role will be expanding outreach to architects and designers to promote the use of natural stone.

Dacia Woodworth, Natural Stone Institute

Dacia is a past board member who has served as an active volunteer with many Natural Stone Institute programs, including Women in Stone and the CEU program. She has worked in the natural stone industry since 2001 in a variety of roles including project management, sales and marketing, education, and technical assistance.

Natural Stone Institute CEO Jim Hieb commented: “Dacia’s industry experience will be a tremendous addition to our team as we expand our outreach to architects and designers. Her firsthand knowledge of the natural stone industry makes her uniquely prepared to educate industry members about the testing lab and other association programs.” Dacia remarked: “I am thrilled to be joining such a dynamic team and to be doing a job for which I am truly passionate.”

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About the Natural Stone Institute

The Natural Stone Institute is a trade association representing every aspect of the natural stone industry. The current membership exceeds 2,000 members in over 50 nations. The association offers a wide array of technical and training resources, professional development opportunities, regulatory advocacy, and networking events. Two prominent publications—the Dimension Stone Design Manual and Building Stone Magazine—raise awareness within the natural stone industry and in the design community for best practices and uses of natural stone. Learn more at www.naturalstoneinstitute.org.

 

DAVID CASTELLUCCI RECEIVES 2017 NATURAL STONE INSTITUTE PERSON OF THE YEAR AWARD

Oberlin, OH, February 22, 2018—David Castellucci, Director of Business Development at Kenneth Castellucci & Associates in Lincoln, RI, has been named 2017 Person of the Year by the Natural Stone Institute.

Castellucci served as MIA president in 2016 during the first year of the association’s joint venture. In the past two years, he has also served as Chair of the Board Nomination Committee, Chair of the Branding Committee, speaker at Coverings and TISE, and advisor to the New England chapter. He has served on delegations to the Xiamen Stone Fair, Middle East Stone Show, Marmomac, Vitoria Stone Fair, and Carrara Marmotec. He also acted as chair of the 2017 Pinnacle Awards jury and as a legislative delegate to Washington DC to assist with industry promotional efforts.

David Castellucci (center) with 2017 BSI President Daniel Wood and 2017 MIA President Jon Lancto.

2017 BSI President Daniel Wood (Lurvey Supply) worked alongside Castellucci and commented: “David was there at every turn, leading and contributing. He was tireless in his encouragement of what we could become by joining forces.” 2017 MIA President Jon Lancto (Big Fish Consulting) agreed, adding that “every time we needed help on a key initiative, David volunteered to assist and lead.” 2015 MIA President Dan Rea (Coldspring) referred to Castellucci as a “road warrior,” referencing his willingness to represent the association at key industry events and trade shows. He commented: “David loves the member engagement and has been instrumental in advancing several industry initiatives during his travels.” Natural Stone Institute Executive Vice President Jane Bennet added: “David is a dedicated leader for the association and the industry. No one has devoted more hours to key committees and initiatives. David made a difference and is a role model for how a key volunteer can support the association and its staff.”

In fitting form, Castellucci is still contributing. In March he will join several industry volunteers on a delegation to the IZMIR Fair (Marble 24) in Turkey. This will be the association’s first visit to the fair in several years.

 

 

David Unger Named 2017 Natural Stone Craftsman of the Year

Oberlin, OH, February 27, 2018David Unger, plant manager at Dee Brown, Inc. in Garland, TX has been named 2017 Natural Stone Craftsman of the Year by the Natural Stone Institute.

David Unger (center) with 2017 BSI President Daniel Wood and 2018 MIA President Jon Lancto

Unger’s first experience with stone occurred over fifty years ago, when he helped his father face a fireplace. A successful apprenticeship as a bricklayer led to restoration work and fireplaces made from fieldstones. In 1999, Unger joined Dee Brown, Inc. as a foreman. He was quickly recruited for the fabrication plant, where he was at times the only person in the plant. As the company grew, he became the person who trained new hires. Unger and his team have produced stone for some of the finest residences in Dallas and provided backup support for such notable projects as Cowboy Stadium and the American Airlines Arena. Unger attributes his own success to the good crew in the plant.

 Robert V. Barnes III, President of Dee Brown, Inc. commented: “Unger is one of the most underappreciated employees we have. He’s always working in the background, unseen. To have him have the ability to be recognized in this way is very special. He exudes and exhibits qualities that would make my grandfather very proud.” W. Tracy Webster, Director of Corporate Safety for Dee Brown, agrees: “He and his team make project managers and foremen look like champions by completing the fabrication in a timely manner and with the high quality that we have grown to expect.”

 Unger reflected on receiving this award, saying: “I hope to pass on as much as possible what I have learned through my career. It’s the responsibility of a tradesman/craftsman to train successors. They say you’re not a journeyman if you don’t share what you know. You’ll find that you’re never done learning, because you’ll learn from others, always. I enjoy and take pride in my work and feel blessed with the direction my life and career have taken. This isn’t my whole story—I’m not finished yet.”

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About the Natural Stone Institute

The Natural Stone Institute is a trade association representing every aspect of the natural stone industry. The current membership exceeds 2,000 members in over 50 countries. The association offers a wide array of technical and training resources, professional development opportunities, regulatory advocacy, and networking events. Two prominent publications—the Dimension Stone Design Manual and Building Stone Magazine—raise awareness within the natural stone industry and in the design community for best practices and uses of natural stone. Learn more at www.naturalstoneinstitute.org. 

Kathy Spanier Receives 2018 Women in Stone Pioneer Award

Oberlin, OH, February 20, 2018—Kathy Spanier, Director of Marketing for Coldspring in Cold Spring, MN, is the recipient of the 2018 Women in Stone Pioneer Award.

 For more than a decade, Spanier has made a powerful impact on the natural stone industry with her tireless efforts to position natural stone as a sustainable product within the building industry. She has been active in the Women in Stone initiative since its inception, and her vision and leadership were instrumental in creating the Women in Stone Mentorship Program. Getting involved is not a new concept to Spanier. Over the course of her 35 year marketing career she has continually assumed leadership roles in a number of industry associations.

 Brenda Edwards (TexaStone Quarries), recipient of the 2017 Women in Stone Pioneer Award, shares this about Spanier’s most recent accomplishments: “She has chaired the Sustainability Committee for the NSC 373 standard and gone far beyond the call of duty for that. She has also chaired the mentorship program for Women in Stone—she’s absolutely wonderful.” 2017 BSI President Daniel Wood (Lurvey Supply) commented: “Kathy has been a champion with sustainability efforts with stone and getting it positioned within all the green rating programs. We truly could not be where we are with our NSC 3737 standard without Kathy and her efforts.” Jane Bennett, Natural Stone Institute Executive Vice President, agrees: “She just took charge. That in itself is being a pioneer for the industry. Her leadership efforts were critical in advancing the NSC 373 standard.”

 Reflecting on this award, Spanier said: “It is a tremendous honor and privilege to receive this award! It’s an even greater honor to be placed in such a distinguished rank as last year’s honoree, Brenda Edwards, who has made a significant impact on the stone industry and Women in Stone. I would like to acknowledge the contributions and support given to me by my loving family, my remarkable friends in the stone industry, and my employer, Coldspring, that allowed me the opportunity to lead the efforts for the industry that led to this recognition.” 

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About the Natural Stone Institute

The Natural Stone Institute is a trade association representing every aspect of the natural stone industry. The current membership exceeds 2,000 members in over 50 countries. The association offers a wide array of technical and training resources, professional development opportunities, regulatory advocacy, and networking events. Two prominent publications—the Dimension Stone Design Manual and Building Stone Magazine—raise awareness within the natural stone industry and in the design community for best practices and uses of natural stone. Learn more at www.naturalstoneinstitute.org.

Jim Hogan receives 2017 Migliore Award for Lifetime Achievement

Oberlin, OH and Chestertown, NY, February 15, 2018Jim Hogan, Senior Vice President of Carrara Marble Company of America, is the recipient of the Natural Stone Institute’s 2017 Migliore Award for Lifetime Achievement.

2017 Migliore Award winner Jim Hogan with 2017 BSI President, Daniel Wood, and 2017 MIA President, Jon Lancto.

Hogan began his career in the stone industry in 1985 following an eleven year career as an airborne ranger in Special Forces for the US Army, during which he rose to the impressive rank of Lieutenant Colonel. Hogan applied his engineering degree to his job at Carrara Marble Company of America in southern California. His management helped grow the business into a powerhouse of the stone industry, now primarily involved in large scale commercial projects. Today, he is senior vice president, co-owner, and a member of the board of the directors of the company, whose works are showcases for excellence in natural stone work wherever they are located.

 Hogan began his service on the board of directors of the Marble Institute of America in 2002 and served as its president in 2008. He made his work within MIA a priority and took on his responsibilities as president with enthusiasm and thoughtful management. As president, Hogan was greeted by perhaps the greatest crisis in the history of the modern natural stone industry—the radon crisis. He rose to the occasion, working nearly full time with MIA staff to lead efforts to fight back against false claims regarding radon emission in natural stone. Long after the radon crisis, Hogan continues to contribute to the industry in countless ways, including reviewing technical papers and traveling to Washington DC for legislative visits on Capitol Hill.   

 In a letter nominating Hogan for this award, Scott Lardner (Rocky Mountain Stone) and Jonathan Zanger (Walker Zanger) commented: “Jim’s leadership during a very challenging time for our industry was unwavering and his continued commitment to the industry deserves recognition. We are proud to call Jim Hogan a friend and colleague and are pleased to nominate him for the Migliore Award for Lifetime Achievement.”

 

Stone – Proper selection, preparation, installation and maintenance spell success in stone projects

By Lesley Goddin

For this month’s Stone section, we went to Roy Viana, Dal-Tile Director of Natural Stone and Slab and Carlos Chiu, Dal-Tile Product Manager of Stone Tile and Sourced Mosaics to get an overview of issues pertinent to stone selection, maintenance, and installation for the professional tile contractor.

The first step in a stone installation is to select the stone, not just for aesthetics, but also to be sure the characteristics of the stone match the intended application.

Both Viana and Chiu agreed that natural stones – granite, marble, soapstone, limestone, travertine, etc. – all have specific technical characteristics that make them unique, and make them perform differently in a given setting depending on use and customer lifestyle.

Match stone to application

Chiu recommended knowing the place and type of environment in which the installation will take place – and suggested answering these questions in order to ensure the natural stone is a match for the application:

  • Is it an interior or exterior application?
  • Will it be subject to freezing and thawing conditions?
  • Is slip resistance a concern?
  • Will the stone be in contact with water or humidity?
  • Will it be a floor or wall application?
  • Is it a high or low traffic area?
  • “Once you know the answers to these questions you will be able to narrow down the stones that are suitable for your application,” he said.

Viana added, “Take into account the color, pattern and texture of the stone, paying special attention to the larger overall appearance. Stone finishes, such as polished, honed, antiqued or leathered (to name a few), will play a significant role in the finished kitchen countertop selection.”

Don’t skip the sealer

When working with stone, be mindful of the need for a sealer, Chiu explained. “Most of the time, stone needs to be sealed before applying the grout and after applying the grout. Some other stones need the sealer to be applied on the six sides of the tile to prevent the stone from absorbing humidity and changing color.”

A sealer is important, Viana echoed, as an effective precautionary measure against damage caused by everyday use. “The sealer creates a protective layer over the surface of the stone, preventing liquid from being absorbed and causing discoloration,” he said. “Proper application of a sealer is extremely important.” It’s also important that the proper TYPE of sealer be applied, so become familiar with sealer options and consult with the stone supplier or sealer manufacturer to be sure the product will enhance – and not harm – the stone.

Porous and soft stone need special considerations

During the actual installation process, consider the stone characteristics before selecting setting materials. “For example, there are some stones that react to water and installing them with a regular thinset will cause the stone to curl,” Chiu said. “To prevent this, an epoxy needs to be used. In addition, some stones have reinforced backings, such as resin or mesh backings. Therefore, any stone with these types of backings needs to be installed with epoxy. Exterior applications sometimes require special setting materials.

“In terms of grouts, some stones – specifically soft stones with polished finishes – can get scratched easily if sanded grout is used,” Chiu added. “Therefore, unsanded grout needs to be utilized. However, there are limitations regarding what type of grout can be used based on the grout width. If your grout width is wider than 1/8”, sanded grout needs to be utilized. If the grout width is less than 1/8”, unsanded grout will need to be used. If your grout width is too wide to use unsanded grout, then use sanded grout but apply it carefully to prevent scratching.”

Keeping stone beautiful

Once installed, counsel your client on maintenance to ensure long life and beauty of the stone. “Keeping the surface clean is the golden rule of natural stone,” Viana said. “As a porous stone, it can be susceptible to stains and discolorations from various liquids, especially the acidic ones. Citrus juice, vinegar and common household cleaning products can cause damage to certain natural stone countertops, such as marbles.” Spills should be wiped up immediately.

Cleaning the stone should be done with specially formulated cleaning products designed for natural stone, Viana said. Also he suggested keeping stone away from toiletry products which may contain chemicals that damage stone. Keeping products on a mat or in a decorative basket can protect stone, as does using coasters on bathroom countertops.

“Being proactive about keeping your natural stone clean will significantly increase its longevity while maintaining its beauty,” Viana said.

Direct heat can also discolor stone, so stone countertops should be protected from hot pots, plates and pans by using trivets and mats as barriers between the hot items and the stone. “Bathroom counters are especially vulnerable to forgotten hair curlers or straighteners, which can burn, and even crack, some stone due to ‘thermal shock’,” Viana said.

With proper care, protection and preparation, stone can be suitable for almost every area. However, Chiu said that stone isn’t a suitable choice when it would be “submerged in water and the water contains some type of chemicals, such as chlorine. Pool or fountain chemicals will discolor the stone. Stone is suitable for all other types of applications. It is just a matter of finding the right stone, installing it correctly and maintaining it well.”

MSI’s CARRARA WHITE MARBLE COLLECTION: INTRODUCING THE ENCAUSTIC-LOOK, ETCHED TETRIS LINE

Carrara White is a time-honored Italian marble featuring elegant shades of white and gray with subtle feathery veining. MSI’s Carrara White Marble Collection celebrates this iconic natural stone in a full line of clean, versatile looks.
In honed or polished finishes, Carrara White Marble lends luxury to countertops, waterfall islands, and backsplashes for distinguished kitchens that transcend the ages. Equally alluring in the master bath on floors, walls, and showers, each product makes a signature statement on its own, while pairing perfectly with other Carrara offerings for ultimate design flexibility. This sophisticated stone gives any space a timeless yet contemporary look in the most natural way possible.
The collection consists of 2cm and 3cm slabs, floor tiles in numerous sizes (including sought-after 18×18 and 24×24), and backsplash and wall tiles in a stunning variety of choices running classic subway to 1×2 3D polished.
And now there’s even more Carrara White Marble to fall for with the recent introduction of the hugely popular Carrara White 1×3 Herringbone mosaic tiles and the new Tetris Blanco encaustic-look tiles. Tetris Blanco 6×6 features a charming floral-inspired motif, while Tetris Blanco 10mm features a captivating mix of geometric looks that take this distinguished marble places it has never been.
Discover MSI’s extensive Carrara White Marble Collection.

Natural Stone Institute Expands International Outreach to Turkey’s Marble Fair

Oberlin, OH and Chestertown, NY, January 16, 2018The Natural Stone Institute has entered into an agreement in Turkey with Marble 24: The International Natural Stone and Technology Fair, commonly referred to as the IZMIR Fair. The association will send a delegation of industry leaders to exhibit and provide educational seminars during the show.

David Castellucci, Gökalp Soygül, Caner Özkan, and Bruce Knaphus at Marmomac.

Natural Stone Institute board member Bruce Knaphus (KEPCO+) commented: “Turkey represents approximately 33% of the world’s marble supply with more than 120 colors available. The IZMIR Fair attracts an attendance that is among the top three international trade shows. This is another opportunity for the Natural Stone Institute to further expand its international outreach regarding technical and educational resources.”

Marble 24’s Caner Özkan added: “Having the Natural Stone Institute participate in our Fair to provide education about the Dimension Stone Design Manual and Natural Stone Supplier-to-Buyer Manual will benefit stone companies in Turkey, as well as those around the globe.”

The 24th edition of the Fair will occur March 28-31, 2018.

 

 

 

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