Announcing the Pantone Color of the Year 2020: PANTONE 19-4052 Classic Blue

Pantone color of the year classic blue

Instilling calm, confidence, and connection, this enduring blue hue highlights our desire for a dependable and stable foundation on which to build as we cross the threshold into a new era.

Pantone color of the year classic blue

Pantone Color of the Year 2020: Classic Blue 19-4052

A timeless and enduring blue hue, PANTONE 19-4052 Classic Blue is elegant in its simplicity. Suggestive of the sky at dusk, the reassuring qualities of the thought-provoking PANTONE 19-4052 Classic Blue highlight our desire for a dependable and stable foundation on which to build as we cross the threshold into a new era.

Imprinted in our psyches as a restful color, PANTONE 19-4052 Classic Blue brings a sense of peace and tranquility to the human spirit, offering refuge. Aiding concentration and bringing laser like clarity, PANTONE 19-4052 Classic Blue re-centers our thoughts. A reflective blue tone, Classic Blue fosters resilience. A red undertone imbues this tone with a feeling of energy and vibrancy. This universal color is relatable around the world and in different cultures.

“We are living in a time that requires trust and faith,” said Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director of the Pantone Color Institute. “It is this kind of constancy and confidence that is expressed by PANTONE 19-4052 Classic Blue, a solid and dependable blue hue we can always rely on. Imbued with a deep resonance, Classic Blue provides an anchoring foundation. A boundless blue evocative of the vast and infinite evening sky, Classic Blue encourages us to look beyond the obvious to expand our thinking; challenging us to think more deeply, increase our perspective and open the flow of communication. ”

As technology continues to race ahead of the human ability to process it all, it is easy to understand why we gravitate to colors that are honest and offer the promise of protection. Non-aggressive and easily relatable, the trusted PANTONE 19-4052 Classic Blue lends itself to relaxed interaction. Associated with the return of another day, this universal favorite is comfortably embraced.

About Pantone Color of the Year

For over 20 years, Pantone’s Color of the Year has influenced product development and purchasing decisions in multiple industries, including fashion, home furnishings, and industrial design, as well as product packaging and graphic design.

The Pantone Color of the Year selection process requires thoughtful consideration and trend analysis. To arrive at the selection each year, Pantone’s color experts at the Pantone Color Institute comb the world looking for new color influences. This can include the entertainment industry and films in production, traveling art collections and new artists, fashion, all areas of design, popular travel destinations, as well as new lifestyles, playstyles, and socio-economic conditions. Influences may also stem from new technologies, materials, textures, and effects that impact color, relevant social media platforms and even upcoming sporting events that capture worldwide attention.

The importance and value of qualified labor

In the world of design, like so many other arenas of business, getting the job done right the first time is critical. The success or failure of a design company depends greatly on the people in the trenches in order to translate the vision the design team has for any given project. 

“With this project, the client loved a large format tile that I had installed in my showroom in Hudson, Ohio. We incorporated this into the project. The tile needed to have less grout lines and act as a backdrop for the custom made hood. The tile had a beautiful ‘stamped floral’ design that was all one uniform color and allowed the hood to shine but yet still introduce a uniqueness in its design and format that was unusual at the time it was installed in our area,” said Dostal.

As the professional liaison to her clients, Amber Clore, owner, A. Clore Interiors, Sanford, Fla., said there are several reasons her firm hires qualified installers to perform the trade work needed for its projects. The first is to effectively communicate and translate her design ideas, whether verbal or digital. 

The second, she explained, is the end result and quality of installation. “The methods used are important to the project budget and timeline. Using a qualified and trained contractor who continues educating is a must when working with our clients.”

Rose Dostal, principal, RMD Designs, Hudson, Ohio, is also concerned about who works on her projects. ”It is critical to know if they are qualified laborers so that I know they will adhere to our requirements to build the project, know the local codes and most current methodology, and are up to speed with the latest standards.”

Chanda Seymour, owner, Chanda Seymour Design, San Francisco, agreed with Dostal, and noted designers include qualified labor in their specs to avoid costly mistakes, and ensure correct implementation of their designs.

Clore knew early on in her career it was important to have a high-quality team of professionals who “add value to our services and cater to our clients the same way we do in preliminary design phase.”

The bathroom shower pictured here was part of a full gut remodel undertaken by Chanda Seymour Design, San Francisco. The original space was from 1982, according to Seymour, who also noted the product used in the bathroom shower consists of Ashen Grey marble, 6″ x 24″ honed tiles by Bedrosians Tile & Stone.

In the world of design, she added, there are many challenges when it comes to the built environment. “There have been many difficult design dilemmas we’ve faced, but with the right contractors, creative solutions can be created.”

As for Dostal, working with those she knows is a must. “Since I only use who I know, the contractor and I are in constant communication with what is current in the market place. I go to tradeshows once a year. If I have any takeaways from the tilesetter’s point of view, I always share them with my trades. 

“Before we start a project,” she explained, “there’s always a conversation about what’s new, what’s not, what is the most applicable product before it is written on the drawings. This process is very different from when I used to do commercial projects.”

For Seymour, after working in commercial design where qualified labor is typically required, she began doing more residential design in the early 2000s. “Many general contractors were hiring sub-contractors who weren’t licensed or certified,” she said. “As a result, mistakes were made, the wrong product was used, and the quality of the work was lacking.”

With the finished product being the most important element of any project, all believe using qualified people makes a difference. “Your project depends on qualified labor,” said Dostal. “Your design is only as good as its proper installation. Clients remember the end results. It’s in my best interest to have a critical eye in terms of who is working on my projects, as the trades who work on my project are a reflection on my work.”

Part of the same Chanda Seymour Design project, the kitchen backsplash shown here features honed Skyline marble, cut to size 3″ x 9″ by Country Floors.

Since the designer isn’t always on the jobsite to oversee the installation, explained Seymour, if a sub-contractor isn’t reviewing the specs or drawings, tile can get installed incorrectly, and the wrong technique or product can get used. Incorrect work often needs to be redone. Tile, needs to be re-ordered, resulting in increased costs and delays.  

“Qualified labor matters because they read and follow the specs and plans,” she explained. “They work collaboratively, and question the design intent if something isn’t clearly called out. They take pride in their work. It makes all the difference as to whether a project runs smoothly, is completed on time, correctly, within budget, and looks great.”

Clore believes working with skilled professionals sets her design firm apart from others. “When we’re able help a client from inception to completion, they’re assured the design intent will be carried through and any issues will be mitigated in a timely manner. This shows…that we are able to create a home or space to live in and love.”

David Allen Company presents 23rd Annual Design School Scholarship

For the past 23 years David Allen Company has awarded a $5,000 scholarship to gifted and promising architectural students at the North Carolina State University College of Architecture. The Dean of the college makes the selection to either a graduate or an undergraduate student.

Accompanied by Ankit Ghasi (right), a David Allen Company Leader, presents the 2019-2020 David Allen Company Scholarship to Architectural Students, Jasmyn Byrd (on right) and Maya Miller.

Accompanied by Ankit Ghasi (right), a David Allen Company Leader, presents the 2019-2020 David Allen Company Scholarship to Architectural Students, Jasmyn Byrd (on right) and Maya Miller.

Ankit Ghasi, a David Allen Company Leader, presented the 2019-2020 award to Jasmyn Byrd and Maya Miller, Graduate Architectural Students, identified by the Design School Dean and faculty as a promising leader in architecture.

David Allen Company has a long history of promoting the use of tile, marble, granite, natural stone, and terrazzo through its relationship with and support of architectural and design schools.  With offices in Raleigh, NC; Washington, DC; Columbia SC; Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA and South Florida, NC, the company is celebrating its 100th year in 2020.

A&D firm bases quality control plan on the benefits of natural materials

Humans spend 90% of their lives indoors. This means the architectural design profession must create interior environments with purpose, and specify materials that allow these environments to positively interact and impact the world around us today and for the future.

As architects and designers, we are challenged to be current with design strategies, and rigorous in the material specifications for our projects. The assemblage of planes that define space are constant and required. The cladding of these planes sets the stage as the foreground, middle ground and background of the spatial composition. 

Natural materials shine in QC process 

The choice of natural materials with which to clad interior and exterior design elements can reflect the integrity of the environment-conscious design strategy.

The choice of natural materials with which to clad interior and exterior design elements can reflect the integrity of the environment-conscious design strategy.
Photo courtesy of Micahl Wyckoff of MW Visual Design.

Since its inception, NANO’s motivating philosophy behind its success is one of spatial relationships based upon a series of scales. This philosophy is performed by an analytical study of context and perspective, which translates into thinking of any project as encompassing not only the most removed, observable viewpoint, but also the minutest detail. 

We approach each project at not only the scale of the city, the block, and the street, but also at the level of the smallest essentials – the joint, the reveal, and the grain. In the process of developing a project, no scale holds supremacy, but must inform one another to construct the overall design concept. Building upon our philosophy, we have instituted a quality control assurance program for all material specifications on our projects. This evaluates the product for its life cycle costs and environmental indoor quality, as well as its recyclable effects on the environment.

NANO’s quality control assurance program evaluates products for their life cycle costs, environmental indoor quality as well as their recyclable effects on the environment. Photo courtesy of Micahl Wyckoff of MW Visual Design.

As we have designed both commercial and residential spaces in the last several years, natural materials have excelled in our quality control process. Several of their sustainability factors include: durability over time; positive alignment with the environment; resilience to fluctuating temperature and solar conditions. Stone and tile are the oldest materials in the world and have proven their longevity over the centuries, containing natural minerals such as carbon carbonate and silicon dioxide, which comprise 59% of the earth’s crust. This is important to NANO‘s quality control assurance plan, because of their relevance to interior spaces and their contribution to current design longevity, in addition to the ease of long-term maintenance for the client. Typically our new and returning clients want upgrades to their facilities every seven to 10 years. If the design is intentional, usually our clients want a refresh, leaving the materiality of the stone or tile as a constant within the space to work with for the refresh. 

We began NANO’s in-house quality control process three years ago and have built upon this process with every project that we design. Lately, our residential clients have become very interested about LEED materials and how their houses can become “honest healthy houses” utilizing the LEED residential certification requirements. Even if they decide not to pursue the LEED certification, we use this process as a goal for products and materials selection. The process then becomes a team-building exercise that allows the client to participate in and positively contribute to the design and ecosystem they inhabit. Most of our clients are genuinely concerned with their immediate and global environment, wanting to facilitate change where possible. 

The cost of stone and tile compared to plastic-based products is more expensive in most cases, but the proven sustainability and reduced impact of tile on the environment shows that it’s worth the cost and pays for itself over time. Photo courtesy of Micahl Wyckoff of MW Visual Design.

Educating the client

NANO encourages an “open forum” of communication between the client and the design team. But the dialogue can be difficult when architects/designers educate clients concerning sustainable stone and tile qualities compared to price and aesthetic. In recent years the dialogue has become easier, thanks to the amount of quantitative data on life cycle costs and environmental effects of plastic materials and plastic-based material floorings such as LVT. The cost of stone and tile compared to plastic-based products is more expensive in most cases, but emphasizing the proven sustainability and reduced impact of tile on the environment shows that it’s worth the cost and pays for itself over time. 

Qualified installers produce accurate installations

Another partnership that is essential in the architectural design profession is that of the material supplier and a qualified installer. We work with several preferred suppliers and rely on qualified licensed installers, who have completed an industry-recognized certification program to perform the proper installation of the spaces we design and specify. A well-performing professional installation is the best outcome, and can only happen with a licensed, certified installer. NANO will only work with licensed, certified tile contractors that have the training and knowledge for the systems we specify. 

The best outcome and well-performing professional installation can only happen with a licensed, certified installer. Photo courtesy of Micahl Wyckoff of MW Visual Design.

Within the Gulf Coast region, moisture, humidity and mold are serious and costly issues. When stone and tile are installed incorrectly, or waterproofing membranes not properly sealed, the damage to adjoining spaces, design features, and the structure of the building can be devastating for clients. To achieve a successful, code-complaint building and prevent the majority of litigation for most projects, it’s essential to adhere to local and federal building codes, the IBC 2015, ADAAG, and Tile Council of North America (TCNA) installation guidelines. Licensed, certified tile installers with full knowledge of codes and installation requirements are critical team members for any successful project. 

NANO has set goals for our future designs by initiating our own quality control assurance program for material specifications as it pertains to LEED qualifications, well performance life cycle costs, and environmentally-safe products, while creating performative spaces for the future. Architecture is a generative process for all team members – including clients – as we educate and execute the design. 

As stone and tile are formed from catalyst materials that create the outer crust of the earth, it is only natural that they lead the future in sustainability and environmentally cohesive products for our global ecosystem on Earth. Photo courtesy of Micahl Wyckoff of MW Visual Design.

When designing intentionally and specifying materials consciously, the project becomes a complete system that supports the inhabitable environment and protects the external environment or habitat. The choice of natural materials with which to clad interior and exterior design elements can reflect the integrity of the environment-conscious design strategy. As stone and tile are formed from catalyst materials that create the outer crust of the earth, it is only natural that they lead the future in sustainability and environmentally cohesive products for our global ecosystem on Earth.

 

DALTILE ANNOUNCES LAUNCH OF EXCITING PARTNERSHIP WITH CELEBRITY KRISTIN CAVALLARI

Dallas, TX – June 25, 2019 – Daltile is pleased to announce the launch of an exciting new partnership with celebrity Kristin Cavallari.  Cavallari is a well-known actress, designer, mother, and entrepreneur with a strong social following. Cavallari will become the new face and spokesperson of the Daltile brand as well as a key component in the brand’s new overarching marketing campaign that spotlights the fashion-forward products under its portfolio.  By heightening the end-consumers’ awareness that Daltile offers on-trend, style-driven products, the brand will further set its partners up for increased success in selling more Daltile products.

Kristin Cavallari

Kristin Cavallari

“Daltile understands the importance of providing consumers with a vast array of selections to choose from — because every person has a unique way of verbalizing their individual style within their designs,” said Thorn-Brooks, vice president of marketing for Dal-Tile Corporation, parent company of the Daltile brand.  “Daltile offers a breadth and depth of product that is unmatched in the industry and includes all of the latest ‘fashion-based, on-trend products’ that today’s consumers are looking for. From tile and mosaics to extra-large slab, countertops, and roofing tile, Daltile has it all.”

“As the new face and spokesperson for Daltile, Cavallari is a perfect fit for the brand as she is the embodiment of style and fashion paired with a strong desire to have everything she designs represent her personal uniqueness,” added Thorn-Brooks.

“Everything that I do reflects who I am and my personal style,” said celebrity Kristin Cavallari.  “Whether I am designing my home, my retail space, or my office, it’s really important to me to create something that represents who I am.  Partnering with Daltile is a great match, because Daltile is all about self-expression and allowing you to be creative and bring your vision to life.  Plus, I am crazy about home décor. What better partner for that interest? With a massive assortment of design-driven products that combine function and fashion, Daltile offers me endless possibilities to innovate, showcase my creativity, and express my personal style in any project I take on.”

2019 Ceramics of Italy Spring-Summer Tile Trend Report

 

Ceramics of Italy announces its Spring-Summer Tile Trend Report. These top trends were culled after reviewing hundreds of new products from Italian tile producers at Coverings in Orlando and ICFF in New York. From humble to opulent designs and inlaid wood to skinny formats, the following six themes demonstrate the expanding versatility of ceramic tile and how Italians lead the way in design and innovation. These products from Ceramics of Italy member companies are now available in the North American market for all types of residential and commercial projects. See below or visit the Ceramics of Italy Product Gallery for more inspiration!

 

SKINNY FORMATS

While some designers prefer large format tiles to minimize grout lines and create a large, seamless surface, there’s been a recent swing in the other direction to emphasize the tile’s shape. Skinny format tiles offer the perfect opportunity to create a playful composition.

Skinny tiles

Skinny tiles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clockwise from top left: Appiani Regolo, Made+39 Shift, Ceramica Bardelli Pittorica, Marca Corona Lagom

 

 INLAID WOOD

Inlay is one of the oldest decoration techniques in the book, gracing the floors and furniture of wealthy estates for centuries. Now with advanced digital printing technology, everyone can have instant access to the charm of inlaid wood and parquet flooring for a fraction of the price.

Inlaid wood

Inlaid wood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clockwise from top left: Ariana Storm, Lea Ceramiche Bioselect, Sant’Agostino Primewood

 

 HUMBLE MATERIALS

Ceramic tile is an inherently humble material. It’s created from the earth and designed to last but can also be returned to the earth at the end of its life. With these collections, Italian companies pay homage to the beauty of imperfection and humble materials found in nature.

Humble materials

Humble materials

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clockwise from top: Ceramiche Refin Creos, Del Conca Boutique, Coem Moonstone

 

 OPULENCE

On the other end of the spectrum are tiles that exude opulence. From rare and dreamy marble to high gloss ceramic emulating semi-transparent glass, all of these collections add a touch of glamour while possessing the functional benefits of ceramic and porcelain.

Opulence

Opulence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clockwise from top left: LaFaenza Bianco, Versace Ceramics Marble, Fondovalle MyTop

 

MUTED COLORS

Tiles come in every hue and tone found under the sun, but muted colors have recently taken the tile industry by storm. While vivid colors have their place, the subdued chroma of pale pink or sage green allows for designers to apply entire fields of color to a space.

Muted colors

Muted colors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clockwise from top left: Casalgrande Padana Opus, Ceramica Vogue Materia, Blustyle Country, Decoratori Bassanesi Tartan

 

LINES

Lines can do miraculous things to a room: create movement, add height, or at the very least generate visual interest. It’s no wonder that companies are using this essential element to create striped patterns, metallic inserts, linear mosaics and more.

Lines

Lines

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clockwise from top left: Emilceramica Tele di Marmo Reloaded, Dom Ceramiche Pura Alta, Decoratori Bassanesi Segments, Ceramica Fioranese Passepartout

 

Announcing the Pantone Color of the Year 2019: PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral

An animating and life-affirming coral hue with a golden undertone
that energizes and enlivens with a softer edge

 

Vibrant, yet mellow PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral embraces us with warmth and nourishment to provide comfort and buoyancy in our continually shifting environment.

 

In reaction to the onslaught of digital technology and social media increasingly embedding into daily life, we are seeking authentic and immersive experiences that enable connection and intimacy. Sociable and spirited, the engaging nature of PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral welcomes and encourages lighthearted activity. Symbolizing our innate need for optimism and joyful pursuits, PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral embodies our desire for playful expression.

Representing the fusion of modern life, PANTONE Living Coral is a nurturing color that appears in our natural surroundings and at the same time, displays a lively presence within social media.

Pantone Color of the Year 2019, Leatrice Eiseman Quote.

PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral emits the desired, familiar, and energizing aspects of color found in nature. In its glorious, yet unfortunately more elusive, display beneath the sea, this vivifying and effervescent color mesmerizes the eye and mind. Lying at the center of our naturally vivid and chromatic ecosystem, PANTONE Living Coral is evocative of how coral reefs provide shelter to a diverse kaleidoscope of color.

Pantone living coral

About Pantone Color of the Year

For 20 years, Pantone’s Color of the Year has influenced product development and purchasing decisions in multiple industries, including fashion, home furnishings, and industrial design, as well as product, packaging, and graphic design.

The Color of the Year selection process requires thoughtful consideration and trend analysis. To arrive at the selection each year, Pantone’s color experts at the Pantone Color Institute comb the world looking for new color influences. This can include the entertainment industry and films in production, traveling art collections and new artists, fashion, all areas of design, popular travel destinations, as well as new lifestyles, playstyles, and socio-economic conditions. Influences may also stem from new technologies, materials, textures, and effects that impact color, relevant social media platforms and even upcoming sporting events that capture worldwide attention.

About The Pantone Color Institute

The Pantone Color Institute is the business unit within Pantone that highlights top seasonal runway colors, forecasts global color trends, and advises companies on color for product and brand visual identity. Through seasonal trend forecasts, color psychology, and color consulting, the Pantone Color Institute partners with global brands to leverage the power, psychology, and emotion of color in their design strategy.

For more information on the Pantone Color of the Year, visit https://www.pantone.com/color-intelligence/color-of-the-year/color-of-the-year-2019.

Design ‘N Gather 2018 Winning Mosaic to be Unveiled during BD/NY 2018

Sponsored by Bostik; initiated by Artaic, unveiling of the winning creation for Design ‘N Gather 2018, will take place at the NoMad Hotel in NYC on November 11th at a private VIP event within the Cupola, a New York City landmark which sits atop the hotel roof’s northwest corner. This winning design will be permanently installed right in the Cupola, as well.

In addition to being specified for the permanent installation, Bostik’s Dimension® RapidCure™ was also specified as the grout of choice for each of the DNG top 10 finalists’ designs, to be on display at Bostik’s BD/NY booth #861 throughout the entire Javits Center exposition. Prior to selecting the finalists, hundreds of submissions where received from talented artists, architects, and designers nationwide.

Ted Acworth, CEO and founder of Artaic, stated, “Designing a mosaic for the Cupola at The NoMad Hotel is particularly challenging due to the intricate measurements and shapes of the rooftop and walls. The final submissions captured the essence of the hotel—creative, elegant, and considerate to the unique historical and architectural elements that influence this landmark.”

The soon-to-be the winning mosaic will provide an elegant backdrop for Cupola guests to enjoy for years to come. The winning designer will receive a free trip for two to Paris, courtesy of the Bostik. “This is the fourth Design ‘N Gather we’ve underwritten,” declared Scott Banda, Bostik’s Director of Marketing and Business Development. “It’s important the A&D community is aware that no matter how beautiful, every glass mosaic project is only as good as its installation. Our Dimension® RapidCure™ not only offers the most optimal long-term performance characteristics… it contains 60% recycled glass content that actually allows light to pass through the grout joint and into the tile itself, creating a three-dimensional appearance in translucent glass tiles.”

Comprised of industry leaders and hospitality design experts, this year’s esteemed panel of judges included: Joanne Yong, Senior Vice President & Principal of Wilson Associates’ NY Studio; Jean-Gabriel Neukomm, Principal at JG NEUKOMM Architecture; Rob Polacek, Chief Creative Office at Puccini Group; Joyen Vakil, SVP of Design & Development for MGM; Jake Lamstein, Senior Vice President and Chief Development Officer at The Sydell Group; Michelle Finn, President of Hospitality Media Group; Scott Banda, Director of Marketing & Business Development for Bostik and Ted Acworth, CEO and Founder of Artaic.

For additional details, including submission criteria, and competition rules, please visit designngather.com

View the 10 finalists submissions and vote for your favorite! The DNG 2018: People’s Choice Award winner will be announced on November 11th at the Nomad Hotel. Review the 10 finalists’ submissions and CAST YOUR VOTE HERE!

 

 

2019 CERAMICS OF ITALY TILE COMPETITION – Deadline extended to February 6

 

Entry deadline extended to February 6, 2019

 

Confindustria Ceramica (the Italian Association of Ceramics) and the Italian Trade Agency are proud to announce the official call for entries for the 2019 Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition. Now in its 26th year, the annual awards program recognizes the outstanding work of top North American architects and designers who create imaginative spaces that incorporate the innovative technical and aesthetic qualities of Italian ceramic and porcelain tile. Each year, an international jury of design experts reviews dozens of submissions from all over the continent and selects winners in four categories: residential, institutional, commercial and student.

After the successful introduction of a new student category in last year’s competition, with winners Raquel Raney and Brennan Broome from Florida International University, the jury will once again review submissions from design and architecture students who produce imaginative solutions using Italian ceramic tile. Individuals or groups of students are invited to submit their projects in the form of renderings, floor plans and sketches. Students must be enrolled in an accredited university in North America in order to be eligible.

In the three built categories – residential, institutional and commercial – projects can be domestic or international but must be designed by North America-based architects and designers, built or renovated between January 2014 and January 2019, and feature a significant amount of Italian ceramic or porcelain tile produced by Ceramics of Italy member companies. All styles and scales of projects will be considered – from multi-family housing and hospitality projects to outdoor spaces and façades. The jury’s official criteria includes: overall design of the project; aesthetic and technical quality of tile installation; degree to which the tile enhances the setting; and the project’s sustainable attributes.

Last year’s winners include: Studio Libeskind for their extensive use of self-cleaning and air-purifying tiles for a Berlin apartment building; a contemporary home that pays homage to its fire-stricken past by Ziger/Snead; and a prestigious Engineering School with a focus on sustainable design by ZAS Architects + Interiors.

Winners of the 2019 Tile Competition will be notified in March and officially announced at the Ceramics of Italy International Press Conference at Coverings – North America’s premier tile and stone tradeshow taking place in Orlando, FL from April 9-12, 2019. Built projects displaying the highest level of functionality, creativity, sustainability and aesthetic appeal are awarded a prize package that includes $3,000 cash, an all-expenses paid trip to Orlando, FL for Coverings to present their project, plus a 5-day CEU-accredited trip to Bologna, Italy to attend Cersaie – the world’s largest exhibition of ceramic tile and bathroom furnishings – with a delegation of top design media. An additional $1,000 will be awarded to the contractor/distributor team involved in each winning project. The winning student entry will receive an all-expenses paid trip to Orlando to present their project in front of a large audience of media, manufacturers and tile industry professionals at Coverings 2019.

The competition guidelines, online application and an archive of beautiful winning projects from the past 25 years can be found on the Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition website, www.tilecompetition.com. There is no fee to enter and multiple submissions are accepted.

 Deadline for entries, extended from February 1: February 6, 2019.

 

# # #

 

Ceramics of Italy is the trademark for Italian manufacturers of ceramic tiles, sanitaryware and tableware, that are members of Confindustria Ceramica. For more information on the ceramic tile sector, visit www.ceramica.info. For instant updates on Ceramics of Italy, connect with the industry on Facebook www.facebook.com/CeramicsOfItalyNA or Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest @CeramicsOfItaly.

 

LATICRETE updates its Architectural Guidebook

LATICRETE recently launched updates to its Architectural Guidebook. The Architectural Guidebook helps users create custom specifications for over 100 types of installations in just a few steps, based on industry methods as well as LATICRETE specific methods.
Product segments covered in the new Architectural Guidebook include: Tile & Stone Installation Systems (TSIS); Masonry Veneer Installation Systems (MVIS); LATICRETE SUPERCAP; STONETECH sealers; SPARTACOTE; and HYDRO BAN Shower Pans.
Users can also find links to applicable product data sheets, safety data sheets (SDS), Health Product Declarations (HPD), Environmental Product Declarations (EPD), UL GreenGuard Gold certificates and technical data sheets (TDS). Submittal package details in .pdf and .dwg (CAD) format are available. For the first time, Building Information Modeling (BIM) in .rvt (Revit) format is available for the majority of methods.
1 2 3 11