Ask the Experts – July 2018

Ask the Experts Q&As are culled from member inquiries to NTCA’s Technical Support staff. To become a member and make use of personal, targeted answers from Technical Support staff to your installation questions, contact Jim Olson at [email protected]

 

QUESTION

I have these photos from a customer who is adamant that the chipped tiles are defective. The tiles are butted up and were installed without grout. Would the inability to allow deflection be the cause of breakage?

ANSWER

You are correct. These tiles have very likely chipped along the edges where they touch each other because an appropriate grout joint was not installed in the system. 

Appropriately-sized grout joints are required by tile industry standards and are an integral component to successful tile installations. One of the purposes of a grout joint and grout is to protect the edges of the tiles from damage such as this. 

Mark Heinlein, NTCA Training Director, Trainer/Presenter

QUESTION

Have you seen a rise in issues with tile crazing? I’ve had several issues with a few different factories with different dye lots. From both Italy and Spain, all glossy. ALL of these jobs used one form of waterproofing; all used premium thinset and premium grouts. All of the factories pass the crazing test and also ANSI. Without seeing into the walls, the jobs looked solid, very good craftsmanship. I have had a total of seven jobs with this issue (three of one color – two dye lots. Four others in all different colors and lots). I figured job complaints would go up with the amount of ceramic tiles that are sold but this seems like an issue that maybe needs an installation adjustment? Looking forward to your thoughts.

ANSWER

I have done some checking and discovered one similar job that was having a crazing problem. On that job, actual tiles from the lot that had been installed were tested and found to not actually meet the ANSI requirement for crazing resistance. I suggest having tiles from the actual, installed lots tested to determine whether they actually pass the ANSI and/or ISO tests for crazing as indicated by the factory. The tests will be able to determine if there is proper fitment of the glaze to the tile body.

The Tile Council of North America (TCNA) operates an independent laboratory that can do this testing for you. Katelyn Simpson is the laboratory manager and can provide information on cost and the testing procedure. Katelyn can be reached at (864) 646-8453 or [email protected]

Depending on test results, you will be able to contact the factory with detailed information to discuss resolution. 

Mark Heinlein, NTCA Training Director, Trainer/Presenter