Ask the Experts – June 2017

QUESTION

I was on a walk-thru today and attached are photos of a chip on an installed tile wall at the World Trade Ctr.  There are numerous chips like this on the job from damage by other trades after we finished installing.

The architect is calling out these tiny chips on the punchlists and I’m arguing about with him considering the tiny size.

Sure we can remove and replace chipped tile, but I think there would be more of a mess than they might want to deal with.

Is there any criteria for this?  Like if a chip is less than  1/16” it stays?

Please let me know, and thanks in advance.

 

ANSWER

There are no criteria that I am aware of that states what size chip is acceptable.  It is extremely unfortunate when other trades do not respect our installations.  There is some debate as to whether it is a tile contractor’s responsibility to protect our work, or whether it falls to the trade that comes behind us to use a modicum of precaution and protection.  Perhaps you will be able to bill the contractor that damaged your work for your time to repair the damage they caused.

Please refer to these standards:

  • ANSI A108 is the Tile Industry Standard Specification for the Installation of Ceramic Tile.
  • ANSI A108.02 is the General Requirements for Materials, Environmental and Workmanship.
  • ANSI A108.02 4.3 is the section that discusses Workmanship, Cutting, Fitting and Grout Joint Size.
  • ANSI A108.02 4.3.3 states “Smooth cut edges. Install tile without jagged or flaked edges.”

Other tile industry standards include:

  • TCNA Handbook (2016 Edition)
  • ANSI A108 / A118 / A136 (Installation and Material Standards)
  • ANSI A137.1 (Ceramic Tile)

In addition, you will want to have:

  • ANSI A137.2 (Glass Tile)
  • A137.3 (Gauged Porcelain Tile / Panels – standard just approved at Coverings in April)

I hope to see you later this year when I am in the area.  – Mark Heinlein, NTCA technical trainer

QUESTION

I have a customer who wants wanted to use pebbles on the floor of the shower with grout joints washed really low. Are there standards or guidelines that relate to this type of installation that you can share with me?

ANSWER

The NTCA always encourages our members to use the standards and methods found in the TCNA Handbook for Ceramic, Glass and Stone Tile Installation, and the guidelines in The American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

In response to your question about the depth of grout in a grout joint: refer to ANSI 108.10 Installation of Grout in Tile Work.

In section 5.3.3 it states to “force a maximum amount of grout in the joint.” In section 5.3.4 it says, “All joints are to be uniformly finished.”

Part of the service we offer to members is technical support. We have in the past seen many instances where uncut pebbled stones have inhibited the flow of water in showers even with properly sloped assemblies, which in turn leave small puddles behind the stone affecting the uniformity of grout color. Also these small puddled areas — when not properly and regularly cleaned — can encourage mold growth when organic materials from soaps and shampoos are added to them. This is a significant enough problem that I’ve heard the 1/4 “per foot slope minimum requirements for shower floors may be changed to 1/2 “per foot slope to alleviate some of these issues. Not filling the joints full as directed by the ANSI standards previously cited could increase theses issues. – Robb Roderick, NTCA technical trainer

Low grout joints in a pebble shower floor go against standards and guidelines and can lead to problems. (Photo of correctly grouted pebbled floor courtesy of Stoneman Construction LLC).